Oriental Medicine Department of Acupuncture School

The Department of Oriental Medicine is comprised of 20 courses, or 55 units, which provides acupuncture students a thorough grounding in the history, concepts, and clinical applications of Oriental medicine. This department is one of four that comprises the Masters of Traditional Oriental Medicine (MTOM) program.

The Oriental Medicine Department begins with an investigation of the concepts and theories of traditional medicine, including its relationship to the Eastern philosophies of Taoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. An understanding of the fundamental principles of qi, yin and yang develops as students become aware of  the intricate relationship between natural phenomena, health and illness. As students progress through their Oriental medical studies, emphasis is placed on the diagnosis of diseases through a comprehensive study of pathology and internal medicine as well as a development of the primary diagnostic techniques of tongue and pulse examination.

In year 3 and 4 of the Oriental Medicine Department, students study contemporary research as it pertains to the integration of Eastern and Western medicine; they also become trained in tai chi movement techniques and medical qi gong.  Additional courses focus on the in depth treatment of the wide array of medical conditions seen by acupuncturists, from common, acute conditions to chronic, life threatening illnesses. Students conclude their journey through acupuncture school with a series of Case Management and Review courses, which fosters clinical collaboration and discussion between students and faculty.

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Course CodeTitleUnitsHours
Description
OM300Philosophy of OM220
OM300 Philosophy of OM (2 units, 20 hours)

This introductory course explores the theories and thought processes that form the origin and developmental roots of Oriental medical concepts. It describes the philosophy in terms of the three treasures (shen, qi, jing) and examines how the concepts of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism contributed to the development and practice of the medicine.

Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Oriental Medicine

Normally offered in spring and fall quarters.
OM315 Fundamentals of OM440
OM315 Fundamentals of OM (4 units, 40 hours)

This introductory course provides the foundation for the study and understanding of Oriental medicine. Students are given a detailed overview of the various Oriental medicine theories and practices, highlighting the concepts of yin and yang, the five phases, the five vital substances, the zang fu, jing luo, the causation of disease, as well as the fundamental diagnostic concepts.

Prerequisites: None

Normally offered every quarter.
OM317Chinese Medical Language330
OM317 Chinese Medical Language (3 units, 30 hours)

This course introduces students to the basic Chinese terminology and characters useful in understanding traditional Asian medicine, both spoken and written, with an emphasis on pronunciation, grammar, and proper stroke techniques. Students are taught to recognize spoken and written vocabulary for the organ systems, the major disease patterns, the major diagnostic terms, the five elements, and the basic color and numerical characters. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to recognize, pronounce, and write Pinyin translations for the basic Chinese medical concepts and terminologies.

Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Oriental Medicine

Normally offered in summer and winter quarters.
OM320Zang Fu Syndromes I330
OM320 Zang Fu Syndromes I (3 units, 30 hours)

The first of this two-course series familiarizes students with simple pathology identification and differentiation according to the model of TCM internal medicine. Students learn the basic signs and symptoms for identifying zang fu patterns, utilizing the concepts of eight principles, vital substances, and the organ (zang fu) theory. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate and diagnose simple patterns of pathology and pathogenesis, in accordance to the zang fu theory.

Prerequisites: Oriental Diagnosis, Introduction to Herbal Medicine

Normally offered every quarter.
OM325Zang Fu Syndromes II330
OM325 Zang Fu Syndromes II (3 units, 30 hours)

The second in this two course series continues to explore the diagnostic skills and knowledge for identifying complex pathological patterns of TCM internal medicine. Students gain an understanding of the complex patterns in zang fu diagnosis, including differentiation of etiology, root, branch, symptoms and environmental and congenital patterns that involves more than one organ system. Students will also learn how to write and present case studies in a clear, precise, and professional manner. Upon completion of this class, students will be able to identify, differentiate, and diagnose complex patterns of pathology and pathogenesis, in accordance to the zang fu theory.

Prerequisites: Zang Fu I
Normally offered every quarter.
OM330Oriental Diagnosis440
OM330 Oriental Diagnosis (4 units, 40 hours)

This course is an introduction to the basic skills and theories of TCM diagnosis, using the four pillars of diagnosis: observation, auscultation, olfaction, inquiry and palpation. Students will be exposed to the diagnostic techniques and indexes for pulse and tongue examinations, qi/blood/fluid patterns, the eight principles and four levels of pattern identification, and the visual examinations of the face and body. Upon successful completion of this course, the TCM student will have gained the basic skills and knowledge to perform patient intakes and gather relevant information to formulate a TCM diagnosis.

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Oriental Medicine

Normally offered every quarter.
OM340Introduction to OM Research220
OM340 Intro to OM Research (2 units, 20 hours)

Students are introduced to the basic components and approaches of research in medicine and science. The course focuses on the skills and knowledge required to be an informed consumer of published medical research as it can inform TCM clinical practice. Students will learn the skills and ideas of conducting an online literature review, developing a well-crafted study question, identifying a population of research interest, selecting a representative sample, ethical issues involved in research, designing an appropriate methodology (study design), data collection and data analysis. This course explores qualitative, quantitative and "mixed methods" approaches to Oriental medicine research and evaluates the future needs for research within TCM.

Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Oriental Medicine

Normally offered in summer and winter quarters.
OM350
OM352
OM353
Tai Chi I - Yang Style
Tai Chi I - Chen Style
Tai Chi I - Sun Style
220
OM350 Tai Chi I - Yang Style (2 units, 20 hours)
OM352 Tai Chi I - Chen Style (2 units, 20 hours)
OM353 Tai Chi I - Sun Style (2 units, 20 hours)

OM350, OM352 or OM353 will satisfy the requirement of Tai Chi I for graduation.

Yang Style

This practical course provides a basic introduction to the theory and benefits of Yang style tai chi chuan. Students will learn and practice the first one third of the classic Yang style form set, with an emphasis on the proper breathing techniques and body movements.

Chen Style

Chen style tai chi is regarded as the oldest of the five major tai chi styles (Chen, Yang, Wu, Hao and Sun). Chen style tai chi is known for its low stance (chan si jin) and bursts of short, fast, explosive power (fa jin). It is more physically demanding than other forms of tai chi and combines athleticism with internal qi cultivation. In this class students gain understanding of the history and theory of Chen style tai chi through the practice of basic principles, breathing techniques, movements, and centering techniques.

Sun Style

Sun style tai chi is considered a "combination style" tai chi, incorporating movements from Hao style tai chi and other forms of internal martial arts, namely ba gua and hsing-si. Sun style is best known for its smooth, flowing movements which omit the more physically vigorous crouching, leaping and striking movements of some other styles. Its gentle postures and high stances make it very suitable for those looking for health benefits and for the senior community. In this class students gain understanding of the history and theory of Sun style tai chi through the practice of basic principles, breathing techniques, movements, and centering techniques.

Prerequisites: None

Normally offered every quarter on a rotating basis.
OM351Medical Qi Gong I220
OM351 Medical Qi Gong I (2 units, 20 hours)

Qi gong is a form of art that utilizes one’s intentions, breathing techniques, and subtle body movements to control the flow of qi in one’s body, or that of a surrounding object. This practical course teaches the fundamentals of qi gong, with an emphasis on its myriad medical uses. Students will learn the various healing qi gong forms, techniques, and vocal sounds that they can use to prescribe to their patients.

Prerequisites: None

Normally offered every quarter.
OM410Chinese Internal Medicine I330
OM410 Chinese Internal Medicine I (3 units, 30 hours)

The first of four courses in Chinese internal medicine. These classes present an overview of the pathology, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of specific syndromes of the internal organ systems. Students will learn to identify specific patterns and symptoms associated with the pathologies, along with the treatment protocols and recommendations for treatment utilizing acupuncture, herbal medicine, and other TCM modalities.

Chinese Internal Medicine I covers the main lower jiao (lower abdomen) pathologies, including but not limited to gynecological and urological issues, UTI, and lower back pain.

Prerequisites: Mid Curriculum Exam (written and practical), Herb Formulae I-III, Pathophysiology I-IV

Normally offered in summer and winter quarters.
OM420Chinese Internal Medicine II330
OM420 Chinese Internal Medicine II (3 units, 30 hours)

The second of four courses in Chinese internal medicine. Chinese Internal Medicine II covers specific syndromes of the upper jiao, or the upper body, including but not limited to respiratory issues, headaches, wind stroke, dizziness, palpitations, and multiple sclerosis.

Prerequisites: Mid Curriculum Exam (written and practical), Herb Formulae I-III, Pathophysiology I-IV

Normally offered in spring and fall quarters.
OM430Chinese Internal Medicine III330
OM430 Chinese Internal Medicine III (3 units, 30 hours)

The third of four courses covering Chinese internal medicine. Chinese Internal Medicine III covers specific syndromes of the digestive system, including, but not limited to constipation, diarrhea, IBS, diabetes, and vomiting/nausea.

Prerequisites: Mid Curriculum Exam (written and practical), Herb Formulae I-III, Pathophysiology I-IV

Normally offered in summer and winter quarters.
OM440Chinese Internal Medicine IV330
OM440 Chinese Internal Medicine IV (3 units, 30 hours)

The fourth of the series in Chinese internal medicine. Chinese Internal Medicine IV covers specific syndromes of the Lung organ, including but not limited to asthma, influenza, allergic rhinitis, coughing, and breathlessness.

Prerequisites: Mid Curriculum Exam (written and practical), Herb Formulae I-III, Pathophysiology I-IV

Normally offered in spring and fall quarters.
OM441TCM Pediatrics220
OM441 TCM Pediatrics (2 units, 20 hours)

This course presents an overview of TCM pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of selected common pediatric diseases. Upon completion of this course, students should have acquired the knowledge of TCM syndrome differentiation and differential treatment of selected common pediatric disorders.

Prerequisites: Pre Internship Course, Advanced Acupuncture Techniques

Normally offered in summer and winter quarters.
OM442TCM Gynecology220
OM442 TCM Gynecology (2 units, 20 hours)

This course reviews the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the female reproductive system from a Western perspective as well as the TCM paradigm. Students will learn to diagnose, differentiate and develop treatment plans for general gynecological disorders and to use correct treatment strategies to treat a range of gynecological disorders.

Prerequisites: Pre Internship Course, Advanced Acupuncture Techniques

Normally offered in spring and fall quarters.
OM443TCM Dermatology220
OM443 TCM Dermatology (2 units, 20 hours)

This course presents an overview of the pathology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of skin disorders with an emphasis on psoriasis, acne, alopecia, eczema, warts, fungus infection, urticaria, zoster virus and dry skin. Students will learn the relevant terminology of TCM dermatology and how to treat skin disorders with Chinese herbal formulae and acupuncture.

Prerequisites: Pre Internship Course, Advanced Acupuncture Techniques

Normally offered in spring and fall quarters.
OM520OM & Chemical Dependency220
OM520 OM & Chemical Dependency (2 units, 20 hours)

In this course students will explore basic concepts, history and theories of addiction and substance abuse, and its clinical application for chronic pain patients and recreational drug users. Students will receive an overview of addiction treatment approaches in the modern medical care setting, and protocols utilizing acupuncture and herbal medicine for the management of substance abuse including underlying emotional and psychological issues as conceptualized within TCM.

Prerequisites: Zang Fu II

Normally offered in summer and winter quarters.
OM550Principles of Treatment220
OM550 Principles of Treatment (2 units, 20 hours)

This course explores the development and relationship among treatment principles and how they drive the process of acupuncture and herbal prescriptions. The course also examines different diagnostic models of Traditional asian medicine examining the virtues of one model over another and how, when, and why to use them.

Prerequisites: Pre Internship Course, Wester Clinical Medicine I-II, Chinese Internal Medicine I-IV, Advanced Acupuncture Techniques, Herb Formulae I-III

Normally offered in spring and fall quarters.
CMRCase Management and Review
(2 units/20 hours each for 8 units)
880
CMR Case Management and Review (2 units, 20 hours)
Total CMR Case Management and Review (8 units, 80 hours)

This advanced series provides upper level students the opportunity to meet and discuss patient cases with fellow clinical interns and faculty with an emphasis on diagnosis and integrated analysis of clinical experiences and outcomes. Review of cases includes discussion of primary care responsibilities, relevant issues in secondary and specialty care, psychosocial assessment, and diagnostic and treatment decisions. Additional topics in these case based reviews include relevant contraindications, complications (including drug and herb interactions), continuity of care, referral, collaboration, follow-up care, final review, functional outcome assessments, prognosis, and future medical care recommendations.

Prerequisite: Pre Internship Course, Physics, Pathophysiology I-IV, Practice Management I, Advanced Acupuncture Techniques, Microsystems, Clinical Point Selection, Formula Writing

Normally offered every quarter.
Total55550

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